Miscellaneous

Slow-Cooked Lamb with Whole Corn Polenta

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Yield: 36 bite sized hors d’oeuvres

I love the taste and texture of polenta. During the summer months, when sweet corn is abundant, I add the corn kernels and scrape the corn milk form the cob to add to the polenta. It gives the dish a wonderful, full corn flavor.

This recipe makes a firm, yet very soft polenta that can be cut in circles or squares. I like to serve this as an hors d’oeuvre by cutting a small circle and topping it with the lamb shoulder.

We sometimes cook whole lamb on a spit, where they cook for 4-6 hours slowly turning over the fire. Slow cooking a shoulder is the next best thing. The shoulder has plenty of fat (which is rendered out as it cooks) to keep it moist and tender through long slow cooking.

Lamb:

  • 3-4 pound lamb shoulder, boneless & tied
  • 1 cup Pinot Noir
  • 5 each garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
  • 2 sprigs rosemary, fresh
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • To taste salt and pepper

Method:

Ask your butcher to remove the bones from the lamb shoulder for you and to tie it up as a roast. Most times, they use a “net” for tying roasts these days. The advantage of this is that you can remove the roast from the net and marinate “open” for best flavor.

Combine all the ingredients and marinate the lamb “open” overnight (if you were able to remove the net) by placing it in a large zip lock bag or by placing it in a baking dish and turning it a few times.

The next day, place it back in the net, or leave it “as is” if you’ve left it tied. If you have a rotisserie on your grill, skewer the shoulder on the spit and cook it over slow heat for 3 hours with a pan to catch the drippings under it, until the meat is tender enough to be easily pulled apart. It should be golden brown and nicely crisp on the outside.

If you have a grill with a cover, you can start a small fire of coals (or gas fire) on the outer ends of the BBQ and place the meat in the middle with no flame directly below it and cook for the same amount of time as above with the same basic instructions.

The final option is to slow cook it in your oven at the lowest setting your oven has (it can be 200 – 250 degrees F). Place the lamb with the marinade in a covered baking dish for the first 2 hours. Remove the cover and turn the temperature to 300 degrees and cook it until very tender. You can add a small amount of water to keep the drippings from completely disappearing, but have no more than a 1/4 cup in the bottom of the pan.

The meat should be moist and tender any way you’ve done it if you’ve kept the temperature low enough. Remove the lamb from the heat, allow to cool and “pull” the meat apart in chunks. Remove the fat from the drippings pan and mix the meat gently with any juice that has accumulated to absorb it back into the meat. Cover and chill for use any time in the next few days.

The serve, warm/crisp the polenta and place some re-warmed pulled lamb on top.

Polenta:

  • 1 Tablespoon Butter
  • 1/4 each yellow onion, minced
  • 2 each ears of corn
  • 3 cups water
  • 1  cup milk
  • 1 cup polenta, instant
  • ½ cup Reggiano Parmesan
  • 2 Tablespoons Butter
  • To taste  kosher salt and white pepper
  • 1Tablespoon Extra virgin Olive oil

Shuck the corn and rinse off all the corn silk from the ear. Cut off all corn kernels from both the ears of corn. Then, take the back of the knife and scrape the corncob to remove any corn and corn milk from the cob. Scrape this directly onto the pile of corn kernels.

In medium heavy bottom pan, melt butter over medium heat.  Add the onion and sweat until soft but not brown.  Add the corn and corn milk and cook covered for 3 minutes.

Add milk and water and bring to boil.  Add a small amount of salt to give the water a very slight salty taste. Whisk in the polenta.  Lower heat and cook stirring constantly with a wooden spoon for about 10 – 20 minutes until the polenta is cooked. You can tell when it is cooked by tasting. It should still have a bit of a gritty texture.  Remove from heat and add Parmesan, olive oil and the rest of the butter.  Season to taste with salt and white pepper.

Pour into a buttered baking dish so that the mixture is ½ to ¾” high. Allow to cool and place in the refrigerator overnight to firm up. Cut any shape you’d like, remove from the baking dish and set them on a buttered or oiled baking sheet.

When ready to serve, place in a hot oven, under the broiler or on the grill to warm and crisp the outside.

Slider Burger with Merlot-Caramelized Onions and Blue Cheese

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – 1 Comment

Serves 8

This recipe is simple, easy and fun to eat. The combination of the caramelized onions and the blue cheese pair well with Merlot. Use a good sharp blue like our local Point Reyes Farmstead Blue and excellent quality grass-fed beef.

  • 1 1/2 pounds  Ground beef, (18-20% fat)
  • 1 teaspoon  rosemary, chopped
  • to taste   kosher salt
  • 8 grinds  freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 each   small rolls (potato rolls or any other style that is soft and small)
  • 1/4 pound  Blue cheese
  • 1 cup   Merlot Caramelized Onions (recipe below)

Form small burger patties that are approximately 2 1/2 – 3 ounces each. Be careful to press them gently so they remain tender. Sprinkle both sides with salt, ground pepper and rosemary. Pre-heat a grill to medium-hot. Rub a little oil on the grill and then cook the burgers medium-rare.

While the sliders are cooking, split the buns in half  and toast on the corner of the grill. Place one cooked slider burger on each bun bottom. Top with blue cheese first followed by warm caramelized onions. This ensures the cheese will melt and stay on the burger when you eat it. Place bun top and enjoy!

Merlot Caramelized Onions

This recipe makes more that you need for the burgers. It will keep in the fridge for a couple of weeks. Try it on sandwiches, grilled chicken or steaks.

  • 4 each  medium red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 cups  Merlot
  • 1/2 cup  sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons  balsamic vinegar
  • 2 each bay leaf
  • pinch salt
  • pinch cayenne

Place all the ingredients in a heavy bottomed sauce pot. Turn the heat to high,  cover

tightly and simmer for 15 minutes. Lower the heat to medium-high, remove the cover and continue cooking for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. As the liquid starts to thicken, lower the heat and stir with a wooden spoon until it is almost all evaporated. Allow to cool. Taste and add salt if needed. Store in a glass jar in the refrigerator. You can serve this warm or cold.

Grass-Fed Beef Short Ribs Cooked with Black Tea and Cabernet

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Served with celery root mashed potatoes

Serves 4

  • 2.5 pounds  Grass-fed beef short ribs
  • 2 Tablespoons Canola oil
  • to taste salt and pepper
  • 2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup leeks, cleaned and chopped
  • 6 each large garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1 Tablespoon butter, salted
  • 1/2 each medium carrot, peeled and sliced
  • 1 each large portabella mushroom, gills & stems removed, cut in half &
  • sliced
  • 1/2 cup cabernet
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 8 each  thyme sprigs
  • 12 each nicoise olives, pits removed, left in large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon black tea leaves
  • 1 teaspoon Maldon sea salt

Pre-heat your oven to 350 degrees.

Place a 10” cast-iron skillet (or sauté pan) over a medium fire and place canola oil in the pan. Season the beef with salt and pepper. When they oil is hot (you can see the oil start to get more “liquidy” when you swirl the pan), but before it starts to smoke, add the short ribs and sear them so they are brown on all sides. This should take about 8 minutes.

Lower the heat a bit and remove the beef from the pan. Add the olive oil and the butter, then add the leeks, garlic, carrots and mushrooms. Add a pinch of salt, stir and then cover. Cook for 4-5 minutes, until the leeks and the mushrooms have started to soften.

Add the wine and turn the heat to medium-high. Reduce the wine by half, then add the chicken broth, balsamic and thyme. Bring to a simmer and return the beef to the pan. Cover and place in the oven for 1 hour.

Remove the pan and cover, and add the tea, and olives to the skillet. Cover again and cook for another 20-30 minutes until the beef is very tender. By this time, the “sauce” should be very flavorful and there should be about 1 – 1 1/2 cups of sauce in the bottom of the skillet. Taste the sauce and season if needed with little additional salt, but be careful not to add too much.

Serve the ribs over celery root mashed potatoes and pour the sauce with all the vegetables over the ribs and potatoes. Top with a sprinkle of maldon sea salt and enjoy with a good glqss of Paradise Ridge Rockpile Cabernet.

The Rockpile Cabernet is a wonderful, full-bodied wine that pairs well with rich (comfort) foods such as short ribs and mashed potatoes. The celery root adds depth to the dish and the tea combined with a touch of sea salt balance the wines’ tannins, allowing the full flavors of the cabernet and petit verdot to shine.

Celery Root Mashed Potatoes

Serves 4

Use equal parts celery root (peeled and chopped) and potatoes (peeled and chopped)

Use approximately 4 cups of each.

Place in a sauce pot covered with cold water. Add 2 Tablespoons of salt, cover and bring to a boil.

When potatoes and celery root are soft, drain in a colander and return to the sauce pan.

Add 3 Tablespoons butter, 6 tablespoons milk, 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese.

Whip until smooth and warm, and add salt as needed.

Salt and Pepper Ribs

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Here is a winner for the whole family.

The interesting thing about whole peppercorns is that when you cook them for a long time (2 hours or more) they lose some of their intense heat and leave you with a wonderful peppery aroma. So don’t be afraid of using a good amount of pepper here. Try it once according to the recipe and see how you like it. You can adjust it either way the next time.

This recipe takes 2 hours to cook, but requires very little work during those two hours.

I find that cooking with some of the wine you will be serving is an easy way to ensure a good match between the food and wine. It adds depth to the food, and it brings the flavors of the food a bit closer to those in the wine.

This dish pairs beautifully with the Merlot.

Yield: 4 portions

  • 3 ¾ pounds St.Louis Style Pork Ribs
  • 4 teaspoons whole peppercorn blend
  • (I like the Morton & Bassett Rainbow Peppercorn Mix)
  • Coarsely ground with a mortar and pestle (see photo)
  • 1 Tablespoon Sea Salt, from a salt grinder
  • ½ cup Merlot
  • ½ cup Chicken Stock (or store-bought chicken broth: unsalted)
  • 1tablespoon cornstarch

Directions

Ask your butcher to cut the ribs into five pieces of approximately equal size.

Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees.

Sprinkle both sides of the ribs with the salt and pepper. Place ribs, with the curved side of the ribs up, in a 11” x 15” glass baking dish and place in the oven uncovered. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and pour off any fat that has accumulated on the bottom of the baking dish.

Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees.

Turn ribs so the curved side are down, and they touch the bottom of the baking dish. Pour in chicken stock and merlot. Cover tightly with foil or a lid and bake for an additional 1 ½ hours until you can easily pull the bones out of the ribs.

Remove ribs from the baking dish and pour the juices into a small sauce pan. Carefully remove the fat from the top of the juices in the sauce pan. Place this on a medium heat until it begins to simmer.

Meanwhile, combine the cornstarch with a tablespoon of water to make a thick, smooth slurry. While the juices are simmering, whisk in a little of the slurry into the juices to thicken. Add only what you need to make a lightly thickened sauce that will just coat the back of a spoon. Simmer very slowly for 5 minutes to allow the cornstarch to fully cook. Add a little wine or water back in to the sauce if you think you have reduced it too much.

Serve the ribs right out of the pan, or finish them on the grill for 5 minutes on each side over a low to medium grill. Once they come off the grill, serve them immediately with the curved side up (it should have great color from cooking in the merlot). Pour the sauce over the top of the ribs.

If you’ve got any extra ground Rainbow Peppercorns, serve these to your guests for those who would like it hotter.

Enjoy with a glass of Merlot.

Quail Wrapped in Pancetta with a Cabernet-Balsamic Glaze

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Yield: 24 bite sized hors d’oeuvres

This is a simple recipe to prepare, as you can do most of the preparation ahead of time.

You can wrap the quail the day before and make the Cabernet-balsamic glaze up to a week or two ahead of time. Make enough of the Glaze so that you have plenty left over.

This is a wonderful sweet, dark glaze with a slightly tart finish. It can be used on many items. I use it on sandwiches and grilled steaks.

If you cannot find quail, or prefer a simple substitute, you can cut pieces of pork tenderloin and wrap them instead. Ask your butcher to thinly slice the uncooked pancetta for you.

  • 6 ea  Quail (boneless), 5-8 ounces each
  • 24 each Pancetta, thinly sliced
  • 24 each 6” wooden skewers
  • 1 tablespoon Cabernet-Balsamic Glaze

Separate the two breast halves and the two legs on the quail. Cut each breast section into 2 equal sized pieces. Carefully wrap each quail breast piece with a ½ slice of the pancetta so that it goes around 2 times. Separate the thigh from the small drumstick of the quail, remove the small bone from the quail thigh and wrap these the same way as the breast pieces.

Place a skewer through the pancetta/quail so that it holds the pancetta in place and allows you to cook and eat it later.

Once all the quail are wrapped, chill for at least ½ hour. When you are ready, preheat either a grill, sauté pan or a griddle top to medium heat and cook the quail skewers for 2-3 minutes on each side.

When the pancetta is nice and browned on 2 sides, the quail will be done inside. Place on a platter and drizzle with a small amount of the Cabernet Balsamic Glaze.

Serve the quail warm. The glaze should be room temp.

Balsamic Glaze:

Yield: 2 cups

  • 1 Tablespoon  butter
  • 2 Tablespoons  golden brown sugar
  • 1 cup Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 1 gallon  balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup  shallots, fine dice

Directions

Saute the shallots in butter until they are soft and transparent. Add the brown sugar, allow to dissolve. Add the wine and reduce to half. Add the balsamic vinegar and slowly reduce to 2 cups. The resulting liquid will be thick, shiny and smooth. Strain and chill. Use at room temperature.

This sauce will last for weeks.

Roast Loin of Pork, Roasted Garlic and Chive Aioli

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment
  • 2# boneless center cut pork loin, trimmed of all fat
  • 1 quart water
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 oz coarse salt
  • 1/4 t whole black peppercorns
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 3 inches bay leaves

Directions

Combine water, sugar, salt, peppercorns, bay and thyme. Stir to dissolve. Place the pork loin in the brine and refrigerate overnight. Then ext day, remove from the brine, pat dry and season the outside with salt and pepper. Sear in a sauté pan and roast at 325 degrees for approximately 20-25 minutes until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees. Let cool to room temperature, slice and serve with a roasted garlic-chive aioli.

Roast Loin of Pork with Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Serves 6

This is a wonderfully simple recipe.  What I like most is that you can serve it hot or room temperature.  So if you are expecting guests and prefer to spend as little time as possible preparing at the last moment, this entrée is a great choice.

You can make the Pinot Noir Plum Sauce several days ahead and cook the pork the day before or earlier the same day.

Cooking this pork is a two-step process.  Since pork loin is relatively lean, I prefer to brine the loin overnight before cooking.  This helps keep it moist and also gives it additional flavor.

When a recipe calls for bay leaves, I list the length. Since the size of bay leaves varies so much, this is a more accurate way of measuring.

  • 2 pounds boneless center cut pork loin, trimmed of all fat
  • 1 quart  water
  • 1/2 cup  brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup  kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 2 sprigs  fresh thyme
  • 3 inches  bay leaf
  • cooking oil
  • 1 teaspoon butter, unsalted
  • 1  shallot, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup  Pinot Noir
  • 1 quart  chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 2 pounds fresh plums (dark, red plums are best), pits removed
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 11  mint leaves
  • 1/4 cup  hoisin sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

Step 1:  Brining the pork loin

Combine water, sugar, salt, peppercorns, thyme and bay leaf. Stir to dissolve. Place the pork loin in the brine and refrigerate overnight.

Step 2:  Cooking the pork loin

The next day, remove the pork from the brine, pat dry (damp meat won’t brown) and season with salt and pepper.

Pre-heat the oven to 325 degrees.  Place a heavy bottomed sauté pan over medium heat with just enough cooking oil to coat the bottom of the pan.  Place the pork loin in the pan and sear each side, turning frequently.  When the meat is lightly golden brown (approximately 1- 2 minutes per side), immediately place the pan with the pork loin in the oven.  Roast for approximately 20 minutes until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees.

If serving warm, place on a plate and let rest for 5-10 minutes, covered with foil. Roasting a cut of meat forces juices to the center of the meat.  By letting the meat rest, juices can evenly re-distribute themselves and the pork remains moist when sliced.

If you plan to serve the pork at room temperature, let it rest uncovered for at least 30 minutes before slicing.  If you are serving it the next day, let it rest uncovered until it is just slightly warm to the touch, then wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.  Slice the next day.

Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

In a medium sauce pan over medium heat, cook the shallots and garlic in the butter until they just start to brown. Add the Pinot Noir and reduce the volume by one-half.  Next, add the vegetable or chicken broth (I prefer vegetable broth for this recipe), plums and sugar.  Simmer until the plums are just cooked through.  Add the mint, hoisin and coriander and simmer for another 5 minutes.  Remove from the heat and strain to remove the skins (which give the sauce excellent color and taste) as well as the shallots, garlic, plum pits and mint. Make sure you push all the plum meat and juices through the strainer, as this is the body of the sauce.  Allow the sauce to cool and then place it in a blender and process until velvety smooth.

Roast Loin of Pork with Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Serves 6

This is a wonderfully simple recipe.  What I like most is that you can serve it hot or room temperature.  So if you are expecting guests and prefer to spend as little time as possible preparing at the last moment, this entrée is a great choice.

You can make the Pinot Noir Plum Sauce several days ahead and cook the pork the day before or earlier the same day.

Cooking this pork is a two-step process.  Since pork loin is relatively lean, I prefer to brine the loin overnight before cooking.  This helps keep it moist and also gives it additional flavor. If available, try and get some heirloom pork, they have better flavor and usually better “marbling” (the fat inside the meat that adds moisture and flavor). And remember that pork should be served medium-rare to medium. A little pink is OK health-wise and is a much tastier final product.

When a recipe calls for bay leaves, I list it by length. Since the size of bay leaves varies so much, this is a more accurate way of measuring. Purchase good freshly packed bay leaves. Morton and Bassett is a great spice company whose bay leaves are hand-packed and of exceptional quality.

Loin of Pork

  • 2 pounds boneless center cut pork loin, trimmed of all outside fat
  • 1 quart  water
  • 1/2 cup  brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup  kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 2 sprigs  fresh thyme
  • 3 inches  bay leaf
  • cooking oil

Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

  • 1 teaspoon butter, unsalted
  • 1  shallot, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup  Pinot Noir
  • 1 quart  chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 2 pounds fresh plums (a dark red plum, such as Santa Rosa, is best), pits removed
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 11  spearmint leaves
  • 1/4 cup  hoisin sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

Step 1:  Brining the pork loin

Combine water, sugar, salt, peppercorns, thyme and bay leaf. Stir to dissolve. Place the pork loin in the brine and refrigerate overnight.

Step 2:  Cooking the pork loin

The next day, remove the pork from the brine, pat dry (damp meat won’t brown) and season with salt and pepper.

Pre-heat the oven to 325 degrees.  Place a heavy bottomed sauté pan over medium heat with just enough cooking oil to coat the bottom of the pan.  Place the pork loin in the pan and sear each side, turning frequently.  When the meat is lightly golden brown (approximately 1- 2 minutes per side), immediately place the pan with the pork loin in the oven.  Roast for approximately 20 minutes until the internal temperature reaches 145 degrees.

If serving warm, place on a plate and let rest for 5-10 minutes, covered with foil. Roasting a cut of meat forces juices to the center of the meat.  By letting the meat rest, juices can evenly re-distribute themselves and the pork remains moist when sliced.

If you plan to serve the pork at room temperature, let it rest uncovered for at least 30 minutes before slicing.  If you are serving it the next day, let it rest uncovered until it is just slightly warm to the touch, then wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.  Slice the next day.

Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

In a medium sauce pan over medium heat, cook the shallots and garlic in the butter until they just start to brown. Add the Pinot Noir and reduce the volume by one-half.  Next, add the vegetable or chicken broth (I prefer vegetable broth for this recipe), plums and sugar.  Simmer until the plums are just cooked through.  Add the mint, hoisin and coriander and simmer for another 5 minutes.  Remove from the heat and strain to remove the skins (which give the sauce excellent color and taste) as well as the shallots, garlic, plum pits and mint. Make sure you push all the plum meat and juices through the strainer, as this is the body of the sauce.  Allow the sauce to cool and then place it in a blender and process until velvety smooth.

Roast Loin of Pork with a Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Serves 6

This is a wonderfully simple recipe. What I like most about it, is that it can be served hot or room temperature. So if you are expecting guests and prefer to spend as little time as possible preparing at the last moment, this is a great option.

The Pinot Noir Plum Sauce can be made several days ahead and the pork can be cooked the day before or earlier the same day.

Cooking the pork is a two step process. Since pork loin is relatively lean, I prefer to brine the loin overnight before cooking. This helps keep it moist and also gives it additional flavor.

You will notice in the recipe, when I list bay leaves, I list it by “inches”. Since the size of bay leaves you will purchase in the market varies so much in size, I find this is a more accurate way of measuring.

Step 1: Brining the pork loin:

  • 2# boneless center cut pork loin, trimmed of all fat
  • 1 quart water
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 oz Kosher salt
  • 1 t whole black peppercorns
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 3 inches bay leaves

Combine water, sugar, salt, peppercorns, bay leaf and thyme. Stir to dissolve. Place the pork loin in the brine and refrigerate overnight.

Step 2: Cooking the pork loin:

Then next day, remove from the brine, pat dry and season the outside with salt and pepper.

Pre-heat the oven to 325 degrees. Place a heavy bottomed sauté pan over medium heat with just enough cooking oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Place the pork loin in the pan and “sear” each side until it turns lightly golden brown (approximately1- 2 minutes per side). Once you turn it to it’s last side, immediately place the pan with the pork loin into the pre-heated oven to roast. Cook it for approximately 20 minutes until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees.

If serving warm, let rest for 5-10 minutes, on a plate covered with foil. When you roast a cut of meat like this, the juices are forced to the center of the meat. By letting it rest, the juices can then re-distribute themselves more evenly. This will allow the pork to remain moister when it is sliced.

If you plan to serve it room temperature, then let it rest uncovered for at least 30 minutes before slicing. If you are serving it the next day, let it rest uncovered until it is just slightly warm to the touch, then wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Slice the next day.

Pinot Noir Plum Sauce

Serves 6

  • 1 teaspoon butter, unsalted
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup  hoisin sauce
  • 1each  shallots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 quart  chick broth or vegetable broth
  • ¼ teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 cup  Pinot Noir
  • 11 each mint leaves
  • 3 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 pounds plums (dark, red plums are best), pits removed

In a medium sauce pan over medium heat, cook the shallots and garlic in the butter until they just start to brown. Add the Pinot Noir and reduce the volume to ½.  Next, add the vegetable or chicken broth (I prefer vegetable broth for this recipe), plums and sugar. Simmer until the plums are just cooked through. Add the mint, hoisin and coriander and simmer for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and strain. This will remove the skins (which give the sauce excellent color and taste) as well as the shallots, garlic, plum pits and mint. Make sure you push all the plum meat and juices through the strainer, as this is the body of the sauce. At this point, you can allow the sauce to cool and then place it in a blender and blend until very smooth.

Pork Osso Bucco with Zinfandel & Huckleberries

Posted in Entrees, Miscellaneous on March 3rd, 2010 by Bruce Riezenman – Be the first to comment

Serves 6

The key to a beautiful Osso Bucco is the cut of the vegetables and the way the meat is handled. If you take the time to make sure that all the onions, celery and carrots are uniformly cut into a nice, small dice, you will find that it was well worth your while! Handle the pork carefully, to keep it on the bone. Osso Bucco should be very tender. It should come off the bone with the touch of a fork. It is best cooked the day before and then reheated, or at the very least, allowed to rest at least 2 hours or more.

Ingredients

  • 6 pieces pork shank, cut “Osso Bucco style”, 3 inches tall
  • 6 pieces of sliced pancetta
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 carrots, fine dice
  • 2 celery stalks, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 medium onion, fine dice
  • 1 cup canned tomato, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 cup Paradise Ridge Zinfandel
  • 1 1/4 cup beef broth or pork stock
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves (1-1 1/2”)
  • 1/2 cup huckleberries (fresh or frozen)

Directions

Ask your butcher for pork shank cut in the style for Osso Bucco.

Season the shanks with salt and pepper, then unroll the pancetta and wrap them tightly around each shank.  Dredge the pork shanks in flour and shake off the excess.  Pre-heat 4 tablespoons of olive oil in a heavy bottomed skillet. Brown on all sides, about 8-10 minutes (if your pot is not large enough to hold all the lamb at once, brown it in batches).  Remove the pork from the pan.  Add remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil.  Cook the carrots, onion, celery, garlic, bay leaf and rosemary (covered) at medium heat for 5-8 minutes.  Add the zinfandel to the vegetables, turn the heat to medium-high and gently scrape the drippings from the bottom of the pan to incorporate into the sauce. Cook until the wine has almost all evaporated.

Add the broth, tomatoes and 1/4 cup of huckleberries. Lower heat and simmer. Add the pork shanks back into the pan in one layer, cover and return to a simmer. Place in the oven (covered) and cook for 1 – 1 1/2 hours, or until meat is very tender and pulling away from the bone.

Remove meat to serving platter and keep warm.  Strain out the vegetables and top the meat with them. Place the broth in a small sauce pan, remove the fat from the broth and simmer to reduce the  liquid to about 3 cups.  Pour the sauce over the pork and sprinkle with the rest of the huckleberries and chopped parsley.

If you are going to make it ahead, place the meat and the vegetables in an oven-safe glass container that is just the right size to hold it all. Pour the sauce over the top and let it cover the meat and vegetables. To re-heat, allow to sit out for an hour, then place it covered, in a 350 degree oven until hot and ready to serve. Top with huckleberries and parsley just before serving.